Music Spotlight: Game Rebellion

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Game Rebellion at Freshtheic, Brooklyn NY (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)

Game Rebellion is a Brooklyn-based band with an ultra-eclectic sound melding everything from hip-hop to metal. The group has been working on an EP set for release next month (January 18) entitled “Sounds Like a Riot.” In addition to representing Brooklyn with their music, the members of Game make an effort to support local Brooklyn clothing brands and shops when getting their fashion groove on.

Netic of Game Rebellion at Freshthetic, Brooklyn NY (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)
Emi of Game Rebellion at Freshthetic, Brooklyn NY (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)

The guys from Game met up with SoJones at Freshthetic, a locally run clothing store in Brooklyn-neighborhood Williamsburg. The shop features a turntable kit running through a boombox in the front window of the store and stocks locally designed and tailored streetwear as well as pieces from local artists.

Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)
Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)

Jake:  I noticed that on your website, you currently have some audio tracks, are those from the forthcoming EP?

Yohimbe: No, that is a mixtape that we did with J.Period. It’s called “Searching for Rick Rubin.” What we did was, we kinda took classic hip-hop songs and new hip-songs that were kind of worked on with Rick Rubin, and we kind of um re-inserted them, messed around with them a little bit and that was a project that we did.

Netic: If Game Rebellion is the gateway drug to rock and roll, that [mixtape] was like our gateway drug to get the hood to buy the pound. You know, we gave them like, a little 20 sack. And that 20 sack was “Searching for Rick Ruben.” …That was a good conduit and introduction to what we were doing. People who have been accustomed to it and are comfortable with it, in the hip-hop ear, we figured that this was our way to get them to be comfortable and come and hear a little bit more rock. And as you listen to the rock, it progressively gets heavier and heavier… it was a way for us to really bridge that gap, between hip-hop and rock, and introduce it.

Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)
Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)

Jake: Yeah, let’s talk about your sound a little bit. It’s not really your traditional hip-hop. How would you describe your sound, and who are some of your influences?

Netic: I think that the interesting thing about Game Rebellion is that it is a conglomerate of opinions, ideas and influences. So if you ask Yohimbe what his influences are, they might be completely different from what my influences are. If you ask Emi what his influences are, musically, lyrically, or artistically, it might by totally different than what Ahmed’s influences are. I think that it broadens our musical palette, and our ability to pull from different places, when we are producing, creating and writing.

It gives us a real open, wide spectrum of genres and sounds to choose from, when we are in the creative process. So personally, that is the best thing to have, because your reference points are open. So as a producer for something, I know that I can call Yohimbe, or ask Yohimbe, if he is in a session, just be like, “what’s this type of sound, you know that thing that I’m looking for?” And I don’t even play the guitar, so I might just be like, “I want it to sound more crunchy, and more..” make up words to describe the sounds. And he’ll be like “oh you need a different a different guitar for that” or “you need such and such.”… That in itself makes that possibilities endless… I feel like I got a musical library just walking around with these dudes.

Jake:  Yeah, that’s very cool. So, let’s talk about style for a minute. It seems like you guys have a pretty eclectic mix style-wise, also. What are some of your fashion influences?

Netic of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)
Netic of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)

Netic: East L.A., Mexican gangsters.

Jake: What about brand-wise? What are some of your staples?

Netic: Dickies, I like a lot of the plaids that are coming out right now, from the skate companies. It works perfect with my vibe. Five Four is real cool. Vans.

Emi of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)
Emi of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)

Emi: For the most part, my style is influenced by my environment. Living here in Brooklyn and traveling the world, you pick up different things. But for the most part, I keep it very Brooklyn. I like the kicks, I like the sneakers game. I got the vintage Y3‘s. I like to mix it up a little bit, you know, wool with suede. There is nothing really too concrete about the style, as long as it looks good. Before I step out, if it makes sense, I’m rocking with it. That is pretty much what it is.

Aaron of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)
Aaron of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)

Aaron: I rock what’s hot. You know, Coup d’etat (a local Brooklyn Brand). You know, whatever is hot.

Ahmed of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)
Ahmed of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)

Ahmed: There is no father or mother to my style, really. Whatever blends me into the background. I like hats. I have a lot of hats. I wear a lot of rings, too. Pretty basic. I don’t wear sneakers. Sneakers are for sports. Really, I rely on these guys for my fashion. Because my sense of fashion is kidney beans. This is probably my favorite piece right here (pointing to his leather jacket).

Jake: Yeah? Who makes that?

Ahmed: Uhhhhh

Netic: That’s a Brooklyn hookup, right there. That’s another Brooklyn staple.

Yohimbe of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)
Yohimbe of Game Rebellion (Photo: Jacob Breinholt)

Yohimbe: I like to always wear a t-shirt that has a band that I like, when we do shows. Because, a lot of the bands that I love, I learned of them by watching famous musicians wearing their t-shirts. And so I try to always, you know, hold that down.

Jake: Who are a couple of the bands that you discovered this way?

Yohimbe: Thin Lizzy. That’s a band that I learned about from Metallica…that’s my favorite band. So I always try to rep with that.

Growing up, I was a one jean bandit. All I had was was one pair of pants. Now that I’m grown up, you know, I have a couple more pairs than that. But then, you know, you need a shirt. So that’s kind of when I roll with my people and keep it real close. When we wear our t-shirts, we try to always support people that we know. So it’s always Coup d’ etat, Freshthetic, One Soul, and designers that we know… It’s kind of about about us being self sufficient. We are still participating in this culture that we live in. But at the same time, you know,  Bill Gates wears shoes that don’t cost a lot of money, and he’s got all the money. So like our people, and our youngsters that we hang out with, they spend their last dollar on those sneakers and clothing items, and we can’t support that, at all. When you see the guys in Game wearing something, you know, they used their own resources for that, instead of just swiping the plastic. That’s something that I hope we could kind of pass along to our youngsters.

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